Ultra-Christianity: Lessons Learned from God while Training for an Ultra-Marathon

Ultra-Christianity: Part 1 - Introduction
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computavel.xtage.com.br/857.php If we do not know what is in His Word, how can we be obedient to it and how can we draw closer to Him?

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For then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will have good success. My tongue shall speak of Your Word, for all Your commandments are righteous. I believe God is looking for long distance runners, so to speak, people who are committed and able to go the distance. Commitment is yet another characteristic of Ultra-Christianity. The Apostle Paul had that type of commitment and demonstrated long distance runner type attributes. Near the end of his life, in a letter to Timothy, he reflects:.

I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. I think this thought captures a core truth: if we truly embrace the worth and reality of the identity of the Biblical Christ, the only logical and right response is to "bind ourself" to Him. Thank you for the poignant reminder from Ps concerning the one-sided faithfulness of the Lord. I can scarcely read through Hosea without weeping at the self-giving, self-denying love of God for those who reject Him. As I was reading through this post, 2Ti kept coming into my head, which you appropriately ended with.

Like you said That is like the clay pot telling the potter how to design it. Also, I liked you mentioning of Paul as an example of someone who was totally committed to Jesus, the Christ Impact is a group of Christian men who want to see men take an active role in the world. This blog was designed to offer men all around the world a different point of view by gathering men from different walks of life together to provide fresh insight to todays problems and questions. RSS Feed. You are here Home.

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Long distance runners for Christ I'm in. Lead the way, Thom! Totally agreed! Blog Category:. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Mitch Sisskind.

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The story of the woman who shocked the running world in when she won the sport's most grueling race miles from Death Valley to Mount Whitney--beating her closest competitor by 5 hours! One year after her astonishing victory at the Badwater Ultramarathon, Pam Reed again made distance running history when she braved the hottest weather in years degrees--to suc The story of the woman who shocked the running world in when she won the sport's most grueling race miles from Death Valley to Mount Whitney--beating her closest competitor by 5 hours!

One year after her astonishing victory at the Badwater Ultramarathon, Pam Reed again made distance running history when she braved the hottest weather in years degrees--to successfully defend her title. How does this pound mother and stepmother of five muster the endurance and courage for the hour climb from the hottest desert floor on Earth to the shadow of the continental United States' tallest point? In The Extra Mile we watch this ultramarathon champion seek balance in her life as a wife, mother, athlete, and entrepreneur. With astonishing candor she tells of her year-long battle with anorexia.

And she helps us to understand her passion for ultrarunning--to discover how far the human body can be pushed. The success of Dean Karnazes's book, Ultramarathon Man, and Reed's TV appearances have demonstrated the public's fascination with this growing sport. Reed's book will be an inspiration to women everywhere. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. More Details Original Title. Other Editions 4.

Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Extra Mile , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. Sort order. Mar 06, Sabine rated it really liked it Shelves: , running-ultra. I did enjoy reading about Pam's races, her successes, training and life in general.

Our latest Narratively story isn't available online - we printed the entire thing on a tote bag!

I am desperately trying to help those in need through my full-time job in social work. Some have referred to the Quiverfull position as Providentialism , [7] while other sources have simply referred to it as a manifestation of natalism. Because most people in Mediterranean antiquity were functionally illiterate, those who could read and speak well generally assumed teaching roles, and—with rare exceptions—these were men. Would challenge you to read other articles and his social media responses. Clearly, you have issues with women in ministry.

What I didn't like was that the book didn't follow a timeline. It went always back and forth between older events and more recent ones. I like it a bit more organized. Nevertheless, she is a great athlete and I enjoyed reading her story. It is very motivating and shows clearly that if you want to do something badly there is always enough time in your life to do it.

Jun 21, Kim rated it did not like it Shelves: non-fiction , sports. Trying not to be snarky. I couldn't even finish this. I tried. So many times.

Running Your First Ultra: Customizable Training Plans for Your First 50K to 100-mile Race

But it's so disjointed, and the writing is so poor. I'm sure she's a very inspiring person I picked up her book wanting to be inspired. But I just couldn't get through it, and I found her as a person so unlikeable for much of what I did read. I think I'll pick up Dean Karnazes book, because I'm terribly interested in ultrarunners, and this one just didn't do it for me. View all 3 comments. Aug 12, cory rated it really liked it. Oct 31, Brian Burk rated it really liked it. Enjoyed the look into Pam's life A captivating account about a lost soul, a small mining town and a mile trail race that changes lives.

Feb 16, Jody rated it it was ok Shelves: athletics , grownups , food-and-body-image. Pam Reed is a great runner, but unfortunately this book is boring and meandering. There's so much description of people she knows, and so little description of racing and training. She writes as if she's just always good and running and goes out and does it - no struggle, no conflict, no anything interesting. It's like: "I decided to do this long race. So I went and did it. I ran for a really long time. Then I won. If so, great. But it doesn't make Pam Reed is a great runner, but unfortunately this book is boring and meandering.

But it doesn't make for an engaging book. Feb 19, Yitka rated it liked it. This was a pretty good read overall, but mostly because I'm a junkie for running memoirs, and I'm impressed as heck with Pam Reed. She writes with great honesty about her life, her struggles including anorexia , her triumphs - and I wasn't as put off as other reviewers of this book were by her "defensiveness" at times.

I think she has some good reason to be; for someone who's as remarkably accomplished in the sport as she is, few people even in the uber-geeky community of ultrarunning have even This was a pretty good read overall, but mostly because I'm a junkie for running memoirs, and I'm impressed as heck with Pam Reed. I think she has some good reason to be; for someone who's as remarkably accomplished in the sport as she is, few people even in the uber-geeky community of ultrarunning have even heard of her, which is a shame.

I agreed with her in tending to wonder how much of her relative anonymity again, I'm just talking about within the running community; I understand that most of society doesn't give a darn about runners :P has to do with her being a woman. But holy cow, Pam Reed beat even all the male competitors at the mile Badwater race through Death Valley in People should know about this woman!

What other competitive athletic feats in the world can women be so competitive with men? Ultrarunning is still a sport largely dominated by men, so I was duly inspired by Pam's incredible accomplishments and contributions to the sport. The writing itself was less impressive - again, not quite as disorganized as other reviews led me to expect, but overall fairly unpolished. Most of the pull quotes from other people seemed oddly placed and often unnecessary or redundant.

I found myself wishing at many points the writing could be a little more self-reflective, a little more compelling, and perhaps combed over a little more finely by an editor. Often it felt like a conversational and relatively superficial rehashing of the many races Reed has run over the years. Obviously, though, I was still riveted enough to plow through this book in just a few days Sep 20, Celeste rated it liked it Shelves: running-related , I've been on a kick of reading running memoirs this year.

I saw this book while searching around and really wanted to read it when I saw that it was a woman's story. And Reed blew me away with her accomplishments, and she really lets the reader know about about them. And then reminds the reader again. And again. Her writing had voice, which so many memiors have a hard time with, but as I read, I found that I just didn't like her very much. At times, her tone was one of bragging. And, don't get me I've been on a kick of reading running memoirs this year. And, don't get me wrong, she's done things worth bragging about but it's off-putting just the same.

I was also put off with the Dean Karnazes stuff.

ULTRA/MARATHON RACING AND TRAINING TIPS: MUSCLE CRAMPS, LEG FATIGUE - Sage Running

I didn't know this before reading the book, but apparently there was some media-blown rivalry between the two of them, and Reed spends a fair bit of time discussing it. In fact, she spent so much time talking about what she declared was a non-issue that I rapidly felt that she was trying to convince herself as much as the reader of this. And if she's going up against Dean Karnazes based on personality, then she's going to get blown out of the water.

He's one of the nicest people running trails today. Reed hasn't written any other books, so I don't have to worry about whether I want to read anything else written by her, but in honor of the lack of rivalry, I'm going to read another one of Karnazes's books! Jan 03, Wendy rated it it was ok.

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Editorial Reviews. Review. This book is an easy read with a series of important messages for Ultra-Christianity: Lessons Learned from God while Training for an Ultra-Marathon - Kindle edition by Thom Garrett. Download it once and read it . This title is derived from an experience I had while training for an ultra-marathon. The sub-title of the post is: “Lessons Learned from God While.

Pam Reed is an amazing ultra runner, no doubt about it. She won Badwater mile race through Death Valley in July overall two times in a row and ran miles straight in 79 hours , among many other great accomplishments. However, she is no writer. I enjoyed the race details in her book. I guess that is what I was looking for when I picked it up at the library.

However, she is all over the place in her story, talks about her anorexia, her affair, her personal issues too much. She talks abou Pam Reed is an amazing ultra runner, no doubt about it. She protests a feud between her and Dean Karnazes, but it seems more like a "thou doth protest too much" sort of thing. She spent a chapter talking about each of her kids and her friends, etc. I wanted to hear more racing stories. I liked the running stuff. I admire her ability and accomplishments.

I could have done without a lot of the extra fluff though. Quiverfull authors and adherents advocate for and seek to model a return to Biblical Patriarchy. In her article, she clearly stated her disapproval of the movement, and sets the record straight that she should not be considered a founder of it.

Quiverfull authors typically organize family governance with the mother as a homemaker under the authority of her husband with the children under the authority of both. Parents seek to largely shelter their children from aspects of culture they as parents deem adversarial to their religious beliefs. Additionally, Quiverfull families strongly incline toward homeschooling and toward homesteading in a rural area. However, exceptions exist in substantial enough proportions that these latter two items are general and are often idealized correlations to Quiverfull practices and not integral parts of them.

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The couple advocates for Quiverfull ideas while providing funding, physician referrals, and support to Protestants wishing to undergo sterilization reversal surgery. James B. Jordan maintains that, while children are indeed blessings, they are only one among a wide range of blessings God offers, and prayerfully choosing foci among them is part of prudent Christian stewardship. It is wrong to reason that since A is good and a gift from the Lord, then we must pursue as much of A as possible. God has made this a world in which tradeoffs have to be made and we cannot do everything to the fullest extent.

For kingdom purposes, it might be wise not to get married. And for kingdom purposes, it might be wise to regulate the size of one's family and to regulate when the new additions to the family will likely arrive.

As Wayne Grudem has said, 'it is okay to place less emphasis on some good activities in order to focus on other good activities. While Quiverfull had previously garnered some attention in the Christian press, [8] [37] the Canadian press in March , [10] and in various scholarly pieces, it began to receive focused attention in the U. In an article on December 7, , New York Times journalist David Brooks described a rising movement he called simply " natalism " and sought to show how in the future it could shift the U.

Brooks concluded, "Natalists are associated with red America , but they're not launching a jihad ". On September 15, , Nightline revisited the issue as part of their "Faith Matters" series, again featuring the Carpenter family. Journalist Kathryn Joyce connected Brooks' "natalism" with Quiverfull and disagreed with him in her November 9, , 5-page article on Quiverfull in The Nation. Joyce emphasized that the movement uses what she described as " military-industrial terminology" to articulate the belief that "only a determination among Christian women to take up their submissive, motherly roles with a "military air" and within a milieu of becoming "maternal missionaries" will lead to what Joyce described as Quiverfull's "Christian army" achieving cultural "victory.

On November 13, , Newsweek provided a 2-page piece on Quiverfull, characterizing the movement as conservatives who are "reacting to revolutionary changes in women's social roles and seeking to re-impose a more traditional order. Rachel Scott describes the Proverbs 31 woman as a business owner, educated and very capable. Rachel Scott also shares about "the dream with a warrior angel" that started her "Quiverfull" experience and led to writing her book, "Birthing God's Mighty Warriors. In the proximate aftermath of the U. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

See also: History of birth control. Main article: Mary Pride.

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See also: Feminism , Anti-feminism , and Birth control. Retrieved 9 June Quiverfull families are all over America, in churches everywhere. They tend to congregate in fundamentalist evangelical churches, but Quiverfull families could really be found in any traditionalist Protestant denomination. Brentwood, TN: Hyatt Publishers. FamilyLife Today. Archived from the original Transcript of radio broadcast on October 1, Retrieved Be Fruitfull and Multiply. San Antonio: Vision Forum. The Nation.

Interim Publishing. Eerdmans Publishing. Christian Broadcasting Network. New York Times. Calgary Herald : OS. London: Profile Books. Population Studies. Review of Religious Research. Mosher Studies in Family Planning. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. Social Forces. ABC News Nightline. January 3, Journal of Religion and Health.