The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
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I even took it with me to kindergarten, where other kids were learning letters and I was mercifully allowed to read hefty tomes, having obviously achieved full literacy by that point. This book initially left me quite confused, but I was undeterred - after all, the world was a confusing place, full of adults and rules and great books - even those without pictures. And I was very proud to own books without pictures, after all.

But his one was just too strange - its beginning did not quite fit with the rest of the quite fun story - it was odd and dry and incomprehensible for the first 40 pages or so, and it even was about some other guy Samuel Clemens? A few years later I reread my early childhood favorite I probably reached a ripe old age of eight or so, still diligent but a bit less serious already. It was then that I figured out what seemed strange about the beginning of this book when I was five.

You see, I diligently slogged my way through the most boring academic foreword, assuming that was the first chapter.

What amazes me that I managed to stay awake through it. Good job, five-year-old me! Excellent preparation for that painfully boring biochemistry course a couple of decades later! After that foreword, slogging through any classic was a comparative breeze. Yes, I'm looking at you, War and Peace! You know what you did, you endless tome. Also, as it turns out, when you include two characters named Joe in one book Injun Joe and Tom's classmate Joe Harper that can cause a certain amount of confusion to a five-year-old who assumes they have to be the same person and struggles really hard to reconcile their seemingly conflicting characters.

And, as a side note, I have always been disappointed at Tom Sawyer tricking his friends to do the infamous fence whitewashing. Five-year-old me was a bit disapproving of the silliness. I have told bits and pieces of this book to my friends on the playground, while dangling from the monkey bars or building sandcastles in a sandbox, that in retrospect I suspect was used by the neighborhood stray cats as a litterbox - but I guess you have to develop immunity to germs somehow.

We may have planned an escape to an island in a true Tom Sawyer fashion, but the idea fizzled. After all, we did not have an island nearby, which was a problem. Also, we may have got distracted by the afternoon cartoons.

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Someday, I just may have to leave this book within a reach of my future hypothetical daughter - as long as I make sure it does not come with a long-winded boring introduction. View all 36 comments. Jun 25, Lisa rated it really liked it Shelves: children , unforgettable. So, my daughter just started reading Tom Sawyer for the very first time, and I am jealous of her! First of all, she can read it in original, while I read it in translation as a child. Second, I wish I could still have that immediate, surprised response to the silly situations.

About every five minutes, she comes into my room, reading out loud some funny quotes, making the scenes come alive in my memory again. The fight between the two boys threatening with their fake big brothers, followed by the So, my daughter just started reading Tom Sawyer for the very first time, and I am jealous of her! The fight between the two boys threatening with their fake big brothers, followed by the famous selling of the honour to take over Tom's Saturday chore -the fence white washing, and so on, and so on.

All that humorous content is being quoted in a voice broken by giggles. Her favourite new expression is "the terms of the next disagreement agreed upon", as used in the context of the deadly serious war games that Tom Sawyer engages in. She's completely mesmerised, and she hasn't even got to the scary parts yet, or to the budding love affair.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

There is magic in a children's classic that can make mothers and daughters laugh together at the silliness of naughty boys, and at the fact that very little has changed in the dynamics of childhood friendships, despite the time that has passed since the novel was written. It has just the right mix of exotic, historical appeal and universal human behaviour to make a perfect introduction into world literature. View all 24 comments. You won't believe it wrote years ago, as Mark Twain's procedure is simple and fluid. He do not show off with language techniques or dictionary's vocabulary.

View all 6 comments. Shelves: fiction , reviews , children. Update All we need now is a "lost" manuscript by Twain to be found by some lawyer with the story being about an adult Tom Sawyer and this book being the one the editor "forced" Twain to write. I know you are probably thinking that is taking Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman to far, but what if that was just the beginning of a new initiative from publishers. It could be the latest fashion now no-one is interested in vampires any more? Thinking back on the times, his character and the author, I've come up with three possible ideas.

He became a bank manager and magistrate in a very small town. He married Becky and both put on a lot of weight. They had no children but three yappy toy spaniels whom they doted on. Mas Thomas Sawyer allowed no leeway with naughty boys and the cane was much in use. Tom with Huck and Jim found a treasure trove and were given a big reward. Aunt Polly invested it until Tom was Tom, Huck and Jim bought a steamboat together, converted it into a casino and plyed the Mississipi offering Black Jack and Jack Daniels at every stop.

At 18, Tom ran away to New Orleans and took up with a beautiful Creole woman with pale coffee skin and became a preacher in a loudly charismatic church.

The adventures of Tom Sawyer

He and his wife had a whole brood of multi-coloured kids whom they named for the virtues, Abstinence, Doughty, Chastity, Patience, Industrious and Worship. In later life he met Marie Laveau and went to the dark side, a confirmed believer in Voodoo. View all 8 comments. Jan 14, Doug rated it it was amazing. My all-time favorite work of fiction. I usually read this every summer. As a fourth grader I read this book and took it very seriously. It was my dream to build a raft and go adventuring. Actually I did build the raft, but there was not enough water in the creek.

My other great ambition was to come marching into my own funeral. I still think that would be fun. When I read about Tom taking a licking for Becky Thatcher in school and sharing his cake with her in the cave, I thought that was incredibl My all-time favorite work of fiction. When I read about Tom taking a licking for Becky Thatcher in school and sharing his cake with her in the cave, I thought that was incredibly chivalrous and how things ought to be. As an adult, I have re-read this book several times and love its timeless humor.

The descriptions of a little kid at church are totally relevant today. I have learned that this book is primarily a light-hearted book written about children, but for adults. View all 17 comments. Jun 25, Justin Tate rated it it was amazing. Despite knowing this story front-and-back, it was nice to finally read the unabridged words of one of America's finest storytellers. The scene with Tom lost in the cave is notably incredible, but Twain's folksy prose is a delight throughout.

About the Book

I'm not as familiar with the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Can't wait to start that one soon! View all 4 comments. Although my book is intended mainly for the entertainment of boys and girls, I hope it will not be shunned by men and women on that account, for part of my plan has been to try to pleasantly remind adults of what they once were themselves, and of how they felt and thought and talked, and what queer enterprises they sometimes engaged in. Samuel Langhorne Clemens aka Mark Twain The above quote comes straight from the preface of the book and I really cannot add anything else to it; I would not dare Although my book is intended mainly for the entertainment of boys and girls, I hope it will not be shunned by men and women on that account, for part of my plan has been to try to pleasantly remind adults of what they once were themselves, and of how they felt and thought and talked, and what queer enterprises they sometimes engaged in.

Samuel Langhorne Clemens aka Mark Twain The above quote comes straight from the preface of the book and I really cannot add anything else to it; I would not dare to add anything to what was said by the undisputed and best-known worldwide classic of USA literature. For people that have been living under a rock and thus have no idea what the book is about I will give a very brief description of the plot: it is about a life of a young boy in early ninetieth century who lived in Missouri in a small town on Mississippi river.

I lost count of the number of times I read this book when I was a young boy, but I have not touched the book since. I was afraid my rereading of it as an adult would not be as good. I was almost right: this time the novel was not that good by a tiny little degree. I did find some author's thoughts and passages I missed when I was a kid and most of the scenes were almost as good as I remember them.

I challenge anybody to read the whole scene of famous whitewashing of Aunt Polly's fence, or one of her cat and pain-killer and keep a serious face without any attempts at smiling - at least. Had this been my first read ever I would have given it 4. View all 28 comments.

Feb 08, Fabian rated it liked it. This one is considered far inferior, and it is. Although, I must admit, the opening is stronger and the adventures are more varied. There is substantially more comedy in this, more of a dabbling with the picaresque—far more enjoyable then. But Huckleberry has a more pervasive pathos than this one: overall, a stronger sense of the loneliness experienced one lazy Sunday afternoon in the deep gone-now South Sep 05, James rated it really liked it Shelves: 1-fiction , 4-written-preth-century , 2-fic-young-adult.

Another book where there are likely tons of reviews, each covering the plot, summary, characters, writing and themes. I'll try not to do that, but instead a few quick hits on what made me like this one so much. An author's job is difficult. You undoubtedly have hundreds of ideas and images swimming around inside your head.

You may want to try to correct a wrong in society. You could be highlighting all the things that people should be aware of. It might be an opportunity to share a dream or wild imagination with readers. Mark Twain is all of those things tied together with a big, beautiful bow. He understands how to write.

He knows how people read. He doesn't care about either enough to worry what he does in his novels. And I don't mean that in a critical or accusatory way. I mean that it all just pours out of him regardless of his audience, as he just naturally builds a wonderful story full of memories.

With a setting like the Mississippi River, characters like Tom and Huck, messages like "how do you grow up to be a good man" threaded throughout the story, it couldn't possibly fail.

I'm not even covering the themes around slavery and freedom, men and women, skin color, age, relationships So much more I could say Sometimes we will be angry that Twain didn't do enough, considering how brilliant he was, to help support the causes going on at the time he wrote this. Others praise him for shining a light on what was happening. It's controversial, diverse and thought-provoking. That's why to read it -- to engage in a discourse where you can feel free to share your opinion and understand every else's feelings, too.

About Me For those new to me or my reviews I write A LOT. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Jan 17, Sean Barrs the Bookdragon rated it it was ok Shelves: classics , 2-star-reads , children-of-all-ages. How many people get to crash their funeral? Is it sort of weird that I want to do this? I mean it would be such a fun surprise for people or bad depending on what they thought of you. It something to ponder at least, other than that this book is pretty shit. I mean the narrative structure is a mess, the d How many people get to crash their funeral?

I mean the narrative structure is a mess, the dialogue is appalling please note I said dialogue, and not dialect, and the characters are pretty flat. And this brings be back to the dialogue. It was dull, so very dull. Tom Sawyer, so called bad-boy of American literary culture, your story was disappointing. My coworker and my boyfriend made fun of me when I was reading this because apparently it's written for children and they both read it when younger.

I have nothing to say in my defense, I didn't know I don't know most things if that isn't obvious by now. On a related note I probably would have enjoyed this more when younger. It wasn't bad, it was okay but I wasn't really itching to keep reading it and didn't have that usual urge that I get when reading a really enjoyable book to give up even goi My coworker and my boyfriend made fun of me when I was reading this because apparently it's written for children and they both read it when younger.

It wasn't bad, it was okay but I wasn't really itching to keep reading it and didn't have that usual urge that I get when reading a really enjoyable book to give up even going to the bathroom in favor of continuing to read. I did really enjoy at the end though when Huck runs away and then Tom finds him and Huck talks about how he's just not cut out for being rich and polite society like same Huck. Anyway now I can pretend to be somewhat cultured since I finally read some Mark Twain which is what clearly matters the most here.

Liz I loved Tom Sawyer too!!! Jun 12, PM. Ijeoma In my loud southern drawl A little old school reading ain't never hurt nobody! I like this book too! Jun 25, PM. Shelves: stand-alone-read , 3-star , , View all 19 comments. There are few children's stories as memorable for boys as Tom Sawyer.

Whether it is pre-adolescent fascination with girls, getting away with not working, or a late night adventure - Tom Sawyer has it all in spades. My kid absolutely loves this book and we go back to it every few years over and over again. It is a true reading pleasure which you should absolutely not deprive yourself of. Jun 07, Carmen rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Anyone. Shelves: fiction , children , classics , traditionally-published , he-says , published , american-author , booklist It's just worry and worry, and sweat and sweat, and a-wishing you was dead all the time.

I hadn't read it in years, and found it just as good as the previous times I've read it. An American classic by the late, great Mark Twain. Tom Sawyer isn't really a bad kid although he's always painted and remembered as a little troublemaker, the truth is he has a strong conscience and a strong moral compass.

Sure he'll "hook" "Looky-here, Tom, being rich ain't what it's cracked up to be. Sure he'll "hook" doughnuts, sugar, and jam from his put-upon Aunt Polly and play hooky from school, but I couldn't believe how good and brave he was in general. He steps up and takes a whipping in his girl's place like a mensch, he stands up and tells the truth in a situation in which he literally could be murdered for doing so, etc.

Sure he basks in the fame and glory, and, um, feminine gratitude he receives after these acts, but that's okay. To be honest most people wouldn't be brave enough to perform these acts in the first place. Making each other jealous, giving each other little gifts and having tiny kissing is all part of the cute, drama-filled, very kid-like romance here and I was laughing out loud for most of it.

Another super-fun thing about the book is all the free-range kids in it. The children are just turned loose and expected home for dinner. Much different than it is now, where children aren't even allowed to ride their bikes around the block. Also, with no TV, no movies, no phone, and no radio, it's interesting to see how children amused themselves in the s. They also pretend to be pirates and hermits and explorers and discoverers a lot. There's also a fascination with animals both alive and dead , sores and cuts, insects, knives and half-broken baubles on which great importance is placed.

There's also the drama, Tom and Huck view spoiler [witness a murder hide spoiler ] and that and the culprit's escape cause much tension and fear in the boys, elevating the book from backwoods games to more sinister stuff. Twain is funny and witty as usual. It's also funny and true about how the little boys are such drama-kings, always imagining themselves drowning and how sorrowful everyone will be when they're gone.

They're frequently fantasizing about romantic, dramatic deaths that teach everyone a lesson in valuing them. Twain also perfectly captures the superstitious and steadfast beliefs that children have. One of the best parts of the book is when Tom and Huck watch Injun Joe lie to a whole group of people and Tom is just waiting Lightning he is SURE is coming. The relationship between Tom and his Aunt Polly is also touching. She loves him but scolds him on the hope he'll reform and walk a straighter path; he loves her very much but can't help struggling hard against the chaffing of her rules and decorum.

However, that all being said. Would I read this to any child in my family? A black child in my family? A child in my family with a black parent and a non-black parent? No, I would not. Twain takes a hard-hitting look at the dark, seamy underbelly of an American childhood. Who'd a thunk that this small Missouri town could be such a horrifying place to spend one's formative years?

So much ignorance and superstition. In an instant both boys were rolling and tumbling in the dirt, gripped together like cats; and for the space of a minute they tugged and tore at each other's hair and clothes, punched and scratched each other's noses, and covered themselves with dust and glory. Corporal punishment. The schoolmaster, always severe, grew severer and more exacting than ever, for he wanted the school to make a good showing on "Examination" day.

His rod and his ferule were seldom idle now -- at least among the smaller pupils. Only the biggest boys, and young ladies of eighteen and twenty, escaped lashing. Rampant nudity. After breakfast they went whooping and prancing out on the bar, and chased each other round and round, shedding clothes as they went, until they were naked.

Failure to report a felony. And even sexual harassment. Tom clasped her about her neck and pleaded: "Now, Becky, it's all done -- all over but the kiss. Don't you be afraid of that -- it ain't anything at all. Please, Becky. BeckyThatcher MeToo Yikes! What a scary world they lived in back then. Kids today have it so much easier, don't they? Aug 26, K. This coming of age novel is an important American classic because: 1 It is the precursor for the bigger and more important Mark Twain novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

The town is called St. Petersburg that is based on Hannibal, Missouri, the hometown of Mark Twain. This book is basically a satire of the customs and superstitions that Americans practiced and believed durin This coming of age novel is an important American classic because: 1 It is the precursor for the bigger and more important Mark Twain novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This book is basically a satire of the customs and superstitions that Americans practiced and believed during that time.

Reading this is like watching an old black and white movie and appreciating how lives were lived in that part of the world during the time when Filipinos over here in my country were being maltreated by our Spanish colonizers. There would not have been two "Tom Sawyer" sequels and "Huckleberry Finn" that is considered as The Great American Novel if this book was not written first.

However, given the 4 reasons above, the book is first and foremost about a teenage boy Tom Sawyer particularly his gradual albeit erratic transformation from an immature mischievous boy to that of an conscientious adult. It is also about telling the truth even if it can cause your life.

It is also about teenage love and what teenagers have to go through to discover the joys and pains of first love. Notice that these are universal truths. What you see happening in this book, published in , is still what we are still seeing around us now. That makes this book still relevance to everyone.

I love this book and can't wait to continue reading its sequel and said to be the more important one, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Huck is in this book but his character is of course not the main course. He is an orphan and the son of the town's drunkard. Tom Sawyer envies him because he is cool and he can do anything he wants without punishment.

He appears mysterious and I think he will be stripped of this mysteriousness in the next book. In terms of reading, the book is not really an easy read because of the many colloquial terms that Mark Twain used. I found myself shuffling between the text and the appendix to find out words and phrases being used in that part of American during the 19th century. It slowed down my reading but at the end, it was all worth it. I am happy to finally have read a Mark Twain book. I say: more, more, more.

View all 7 comments. Shelves: fiction. There's not much that can be said about this book by a hack like me that would do it justice. Mark Twain was the first American writer to figure out how to turn the American vernacular into art, and he was the first historian to document how we talked. He also was a visionary who saw the problems of race and the problem racism would be in the future, and he tried to warn the future the only way he knew how: by writing about it then.

He was gutsy and he was talented and he was hilarious, and this There's not much that can be said about this book by a hack like me that would do it justice. He was gutsy and he was talented and he was hilarious, and this book captures it all. Tom Sawyer is the first truly American literary character, for better, worse, and all the in-between. View all 3 comments. Feb 01, Merphy Napier rated it really liked it Shelves: four-stars , classics.

This story perfectly captures the logic, mindset, and rational of children. I loved seeing the way these kids viewed the world, and I loved their rational when their worldview was proven wrong.

Adventures of Mark Twain - O Estranho Misterioso

The strongest ellement of this book is the way Mark Twain was able to get into the minds of children and depiction it so perfectly on the page. The thing I didn't love as much was the meandering plot. There was clearly a direction and purpose to this story, but it took forever to get there and there were This story perfectly captures the logic, mindset, and rational of children.

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Retrieved 8 May Which fortunately I can probably never do because even though I still have the tape, I haven't owned anything that will play it in about five years. Other books in the series. Born during a visit by Halley's Comet, he died on its return. Published February 28th by Penguin Classics first published Het lijkt er op dat je browser advertenties blokkeert.

There was clearly a direction and purpose to this story, but it took forever to get there and there were a lot of stops along the way where we just hung out with the characters. As a plot driven reader, that left me imaptient board at times. Still a great story though View 2 comments. They swear to never tell, and the wrong man, Muff Potter, is accused of the crime.

Tom, Huck, and a friend run away to be pirates, but become aware that the whole town is searching for their bodies. Each of the boys make an appearance at their own funerals, where they are greeted with open arms. As Muff Potter's trial begins, Tom is overcome with guilt and testifies against Injun Joe, who quickly flees the courtroom.

Later, on a class field trip to a cave, Tom and his love interest, Becky Thatcher, get lost. As they run out of food and candles searching for a way out, Tom and Becky come upon Injun Joe, who is using the cave as a hideout. Tom finds a way out just as the search party is giving up. The town rejoices and Judge Thatcher, Becky's father, has the cave sealed, unknowingly trapping Injun Joe inside where he starves to death. Source: Twain, M. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Twain, M.