A View of the Present State of Ireland

A view of the present state of Ireland. Edited by W.L. Renwick.
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chelovekovedenie.kovalev.com.ua/assets/map.php Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Oct 14, Delirious Disquisitions rated it it was ok Shelves: lit-major-book-goals , essays-articles. Written during Spencer's time in Ireland as a British envoy.

A View of the State of Ireland: The Production and Experience of Consumption

It is actually pretty horrifying to read Edmund Spencer's account of the Irish "problem" and his brutal solutions for controlling them. Though Spencer's words are conveyed through a conversation between two fictional characters, it is no Edmund Spencer's "A View of the State of Ireland: The Production and Experience of Consumption" was written in light of the Irish uprising and intended to act as a call for the subjugation of Ireland.

Though Spencer's words are conveyed through a conversation between two fictional characters, it is none the less chilling to read his description of the Irish population.

A view of the present state of Ireland;

Rating details. Bohemus, and yet is used amongest all the Tartarians and the people about the Caspian Sea , which are naturally Scythians, to live in heardes as they call them, being the very same that the Irish bolyes are, driving theyr cattell continually with them, and feeding onely upon theyr milke and white meates. In contrast to Brady's concern with "crisis," Canny promotes a pragmatic reading: Spenser's View , composed in , has long been accepted as a fundamental contribution to the theory of colonization, but it has not been adequately appreciated as a political text because commentators have at once exaggerated and diminished its originality …. Having indicated that the View is generically diffuse and fashioned for aesthetic as well as material ends, I now intend to reorientate Spenser's View , by placing it in the context of Renaissance dialogue and historiography. And to this end the Tanist is always ready knowne, if it should happen the Captaine suddenly to dy or be slayne in batayle, or to be out of the country, to defend and kepe it from all such doubts and dangers. Smith maintains that this edition is "inadequate and misleading in many respects, [and] is perhaps least satisfactory in its remarks upon Spenser's sources ….

Particularly appealing is Spencer's hypothesis on the degeneration of the British settlers in Ireland and how its root cause is contamination from Irish women. Spencer proposes three main ways in which they corrupt the British blood: 1 through the nursing of British children, Irish nannies impart the Irish language onto them, which is one of the main causes of degeneration.

Such was his hatred for the Irish that Spencer proposes famine and slow starvation to be the best method to eliminate the Irish population.

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It is a bigoted, racist, and utterly hateful and yet clinical account of the British attitude towards Ireland. In either case it is a fascinating, if slightly nauseous, account of British-Irish relations in the Renaissance period. Jan 21, Megan Crotty rated it did not like it.

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It wasn't all about sonnets for Spenser, it was also about promoting racism and the "root and branch" clearing out of Ireland's native population. Spenser couches his vitriol in the most pompous and self-important way, using the greek tradition to format his horrific ideas about the Irish and the Old English living in Ireland, making his "View" unreadable on several levels, which is truly a noteworthy accomplishment.

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He joins a long tradition of writing that justifies and advocates violence alon It wasn't all about sonnets for Spenser, it was also about promoting racism and the "root and branch" clearing out of Ireland's native population. He joins a long tradition of writing that justifies and advocates violence along the lines or race and class in this tract, and one can trace these connections from the 12th century to the present, if they so choose.

I don't care how many "pretty little rooms" he created, this tract makes me completely abhor Spenser and everything he ever wrote.

ISBN 13: 9780198124085

Pompous, social climbing, racist bigoted that he was. Sep 26, Andrew added it. In addition to writing the most famous epic poem of the Renaissance, it turns out Edmund Spenser was also a racist, and in the way that only a Renaissance humanist could be - proposing odd plans that were genocide that couldn't be called genocide, suggesting racialist discourse toward the Irish because of factors like fluids in the body and similarities to Scythians, and proving rhetorically what he can't do scientifically.

Throughout it all, the brilliant poet clashes with the xenophobic genera In addition to writing the most famous epic poem of the Renaissance, it turns out Edmund Spenser was also a racist, and in the way that only a Renaissance humanist could be - proposing odd plans that were genocide that couldn't be called genocide, suggesting racialist discourse toward the Irish because of factors like fluids in the body and similarities to Scythians, and proving rhetorically what he can't do scientifically.

Throughout it all, the brilliant poet clashes with the xenophobic generalist, and the result is one of the oddest and most controversial texts of the 16 Century: a work that finds startling conclusions from strange jumping off points. His final plan starve the Irish into submission is either MEIN KAMPF or a pretty rational response considering contemporary uprisings; whatever the case, Spenser's not-so-modest proposal must be seen to be believed. Jun 18, Will Miller rated it really liked it. Star rating for the edition, not the work. It's ludicrous to star-rate anything that's still being read five hundred years after its first publication.

The edition is sound with helpful notes and a good critical introduction. The work is problematic, of course, for its barbaric policy recommendations in dealing with "the Irish problem" and naturally has attracted a lot of post-colonial criticism. There are still fascinating moments in this work, however - some very interesting descriptions of Iri Star rating for the edition, not the work. There are still fascinating moments in this work, however - some very interesting descriptions of Irish poetry and culture.

Therfore are these evill customes of fostering and marrying with the Irish most carefully to be restrayned; for of them two, the third evill, that is the custome of language which I speake of cheifly proceedeth. There is amongst the Irish a certayne kind of people called Bards, which are to them insteede of poetts, whose profession is to sett foorth the prayses and disprayses of men in theyr poems and rimes; the which are had in soe high request and estimation amongest them, that none dare to displease them for feare of running into reproche through theyr offence, and to be made infamous in the mouthes of all men.

For theyr verses are taken up with a generall applause, and usually songe at all feasts and meetinges, but certayne other persons, whose proper function that is, which also receave for the same greate rewardes and reputation besides.

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It is most true that such Poetts, as in theyr writings doe laboure to better the manners of men, and through the sweete bayte of theyre numbers, to steale into yonge spiritts a desire of honour and vertue, are worthy to be had in great respect. But these Irish Bards are for the most part of another mynd, and soe farr from instructing yong men in morall discipline, that they themselves doe more desarve to be sharpely disciplined; for they seldome use to choose unto themselves the doinges of good men for the ornamentes of theyr poems, but whomsoever they find to be most licentious of life, most bold and lawless in his doinges, most daungerous and desperate in all partes of disobedience and rebellious disposition, him they sett up and glorifye in theyr rimes, him they prayse to the people, and to yong men make an example to followe.

Besides this, evill thinges being decked and suborned with the gay attyre of goodly woordes, may easely deceave and carrye away the affection of a yong mynd, that is not well stayed, but desirous by some bold adventure to make proofe of himself; for being as they all be brought up idelly without awe of parentes, without precepts of masters, without feare of offence, not being directed, or employed in any course of life, which may carrye them to vertue, will easely be drawen to followe such as any shall sett before them: for a yong mynd cannot rest; and yf he be not still busyed in some goodness, he will find himself such busines as shall soone busye all about him.

In which yf he shall finde any to prayse him, and to give him encouragement, as those Bards and rimers doe for a litle reward, or a share of a stollen cowe, then waxeth he most insolent and half madd with the love of himself, and his owne lewde deedes. And as for woordes to sett foorth such lewdness, it is not hard for them to give a goodly glose and paynted shewe thereunto, borrowed even from the prayses which are proper to vertue itself. But tell me I pray you have they any arte in theyr compositions? Or be they any thing wittye or well savoured, as Poems should be? This evill custome therfore needeth reformation.

Nowe we will proceede to other like defectes, amongest which there is one generall inconvenience which raigneth allmost throughout all Ireland: that is, of the Lordes of landes and Free-holders, whoe doe not there use to sett out theyr landes to farme, or for terme of yeares, to theyr tenauntes, but only from yeare to yeare, and some during pleasure; neither indede will the Irish tenaunt or husbandman otherwise take his land then soe longe as he list himselfe.

All which he hath forborne, and spared so much expence, for that he had noe firme estate in his tenement, but was onely a tenaunt at will or litle more, and soe at will may leave it. Therfore the faulte which I finde in Religion is but one, but the same is universall throughe out all the countrey; that is, that they are all Papistes by theyr profession, but in the same soe blindely and brutishly enformed, for the most parte as that you would rather thinke them Atheistes or Infidells for not one amongest an hundred knoweth any grounde of religion, or any article of his faythe, but can perhaps say his Pater noster, or his Ave Maria , without any knowledge or understanding what one woorde therof meaneth.

Or what comforte of life shall he have, when all his parishioners are soe unsociable, soe intractable, so ill-affected-unto him, as they usually be to all the English? But that in the realme of Ireland we see much otherwise, for everye day we perceave the troubles to growe more upon us, and one evill growing upon another, insoe-much as there is noe parte sounde nor ascertayned, but all have theyr eares upright, wayting when the watch-woord shall come that they should all rise generally into rebellion, and cast away the English subjection. To which there nowe litle wanteth; for I thinke the woorde be allreadye given, and there wanteth nothing but opportunitye,.

But all the realme is first to be reformed, and lawes are afterwardes to be made for keeping and conteyning it in that reformed estate. The first thing must be to send over into that realme such a stronge power of men, as that shall perforce bring in all that rebellious route of loose people, which either doe nowe stande out in open armes, or in wandring companyes doe keepe the woodes, spoyling the good subject. For you have prefixed a shorte time of the continuance therof. It seemeth strange to me that the English should take more delight to speak that language than their own, whereas they should, methinks, rather take scorn to acquaint their tongues thereto.

For it hath ever been the use of the conqueror to despise the language of the conquered and to force him by all means to learn his.

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So did the Romans always use, insomuch that there is almost no nation in the world but is sprinkled with their language. It were good therefore, meseems, to search out the original cause of this evil, for the same being discovered, a redress thereof will the more easily be provided. For I think it very strange that, the English being so many and the Irish so few as they then were left, the fewer should draw the more unto their use. I suppose that the chief cause of bringing in the Irish language amongst them was specially their fostering and marrying with the Irish, the which are two most dangerous infections.

For, besides that young children be like apes, which will affect and imitate what they see done before them, especially by their nurses whom they love so well, they moreover draw into themselves together with their suck even the nature and disposition of their nurses. The next is the marrying with the Irish, which how dangerous a thing it is in all commonwealths appeareth to every simplest sense.

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For instead of those few good I could count unto them infinite many evil. And, indeed, how can such matching succeed well, seeing that commonly the child taketh most of his nature of the mother, besides speech, manners, and inclination, which are for the most part agreeable to the conditions of their mothers?

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Corpus of Electronic Texts Edition. A View of the present State of Ireland. Author: Edmund Spenser. Table of Contents. Background details and bibliographic. Eamonn Grennan, Language and politics: a note on some metaphors in Spenser's 'A View of the Present State of Ireland'. In: Spenser Studies 3. () 99–

For by them they are first framed and fashioned, so as what they receive once from them they will hardly ever after forego. Therefore are those evil customs of fostering and marrying with Irish most carefully to be restrained, for of those two the third evil, that is, the custom of language, which I spake of, chiefly proceedeth. The end will, I assure me, be very short, and much sooner than can be in so great a trouble, as it seemeth, hoped for.

The proof whereof I saw sufficiently exampled in these late wars of Munster, for, notwithstanding that the same was a most rich and plentiful country, full of corn and cattle, that you would have thought they should have been able to stand long, yet ere one year and a half they were brought to such wretchedness as that any stony heart would have rued the same. Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them.

And if they found a plot of watercresses or shamrocks, there they flocked as to a feast for the time, yet not able long to continue there withal; that in short space there were none almost left, and a most populous and plentiful country suddenly left void of man and beast. Yet sure, in all that war there perished not many by the sword, but all by the extremity of famine which they themselves had wrought.

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